UCSD Summer Workshops 2017

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Summer Workshop Registration Now Open!

This summer will be the best summer ever at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. With over 25 summer camps to choose from, there is certain to be something for every student in your family! And this year, we are introducing StudentTECH Junior, a series of fun-filled camps for 3rd-5th grade students. Did we say 3rd-5th grade? Yes, we did!  A successful pilot program last summer and parent requests spurred us to include upper elementary school workshops. Take a look at our summer offerings and join the fun!

About Our Grade Levels:  When signing up for our workshops, please refer to the grade level your student will be in the fall.  If your student wishes to take a class that references his/her current grade, that is fine, too.

PLEASE NOTE: As classes fill, they will be removed from this website.

Summer Programs – June 19- August 18, 2017, 8:30am-3:00pm daily

June 19-23, 2017

Bring Your Creativity to Life with MIT App Inventor
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Do you enjoy turning your ideas into real world products?
Are you interested in using your creativity to learn something exciting and new?

Then come spend a fun-filled week creating Android Apps using MIT’s App Inventor! You’ll learn how to make and import your own sounds, avatars, and objects. Once you’ve turned your ideas into real-life apps you can even share it with your friends!

Topics to be Covered

Monday, June 19
·       App Inventor 101
·       Ideas, Ideas, and MORE Ideas!  Tuesday, June 20
·       Creating and importing sounds, images, and backgrounds
·       Methods, Parameters, and Functions – What are they and HOW can I use them?
·       Multiple screens and buttons  Wednesday, June 21
·       Advanced features and functions  Thursday, June 22
·       Game design and development
·       Collaborative Competition  Friday, June 23
·       Exporting your apps, sharing, and QR Cod

Prerequisites

  • Must be a current middle school student in grade 7-8.
  • Past programming experience is helpful, but not necessary
  • Students will be given online resources to continue creating apps at home on their own

Instructor: Devon Senneseth, Computer Science, Montgomery High School
Course open to students in grades 7-8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop


Have Fun with Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs)
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San Diego is a leader when it comes to building Remotely Operated Vehicles, (ROV’s), especially when it comes to exploring our ocean.  This technology, also known as Blue Technology, is an ever expanding field with many employment opportunities available. Over 70% of our planet is covered with water.  There are places in our ocean we have never seen but with the advent of ROV’s mounted with cameras, we can explore virtually anywhere depending on how the ROV was designed.  In this course, we will build a generic ROV, test it out and then redesign/build another ROV that will be more efficient based on our trial and error testing.

What is an ROV?
A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is an unoccupied underwater robot that is connected to a ship by a series of cables. These cables transmit command and control signals between the operator and the ROV, allowing remote navigation of the vehicle.

Why Are ROVs Advancing Ocean Science?
Technology to support deep-ocean exploration, research, and information collection has steadily improved, but greater improvements are needed to significantly increase the pace, effectiveness, and scope of understanding our ocean world. Advancements will enable us to explore longer, deeper, and across greater spans while collecting and sharing new and more data. As always, these tools must withstand the rigors of depth, salinity, and pressure.

There’s a lot to Learn so Let’s See What Topics Will be Covered This Week:

Day 1 – Introduction to the ROV and the Science Behind them
– What is an ROV
– Buoyancy

– Density
– Building our first prototype in groups of 2-3

Day 2 – Complete construction
– Electricity – how motors work
– Test ROV  (Pool)

Day 3 – ReDesign
– New design
– Start to build new ROV
– Test ROV (afternoon in the Pool)

Day 4 – Ocean trial
– Repairs/Adjustments to new design
– Ocean trials with mounted camera

Day 5 – How it’s done?

– Visit local manufacturer of ROVs

Prerequisites

  • Must be a middle school student in grade 7-8
  • Eager to ask questions, share ideas, and help others in the class 

Instructor: Dan Grendziak, Vice Principal, Farb Middle School
Course open to students in grades 7-8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Film Making 101: Introduction to Video Production
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Learn How to Create a Video that Can Help Change the World, or Get You a College Scholarship, Win a Science Fair or Raise Money to Create Your First Business.

This course will be a fun and creative exploration into the world of Video Production. In one week students will write, shoot and edit a short video. They will add music, titles, credits and possibly even special effects to their production. Students will have a chance to explore the latest editing software like the pros do and learn a valuable skill (creating videos) that you will use again!

Anthony Palmiotto has been teaching Cinematic Arts, Multimedia and Video Production at Point Loma High School in the SDUSD since 2007. Under his direction his students have been recognized in local, regional and national video competitions. A few notable highlights are below.

In 2011, a class video project helped a student become a finalist in the Google Science Fair.

In 2013, a class project entitled “Dear SeaWorld”, about the ethical use of animals for entertainment was featured internationally on CNN.

In 2014, a student video project was a finalist in the White House Film festival. The video played on the WhiteHouse.Gov website.

In 2015, 2012 and 2009, student video projects won the San Diegans Waste No Water Film Contest. The Winning student videos about water conservation played all summer long in several AMC Movie Theaters in San Diego.

Graduates from Mr. Palmiotto’s Cinematic Arts/Video Production program have gone on to to study at the top film schools in the country (e.g. USC, NYU – Tisch School of the Arts and Chapman University).

What you can expect from this workshop:

* How to write a script.
* The basic understandings of a Video Camera and Tripod.
* How to edit with Adobe Premiere.
* How to add music, titles/credits and export your video project.
* You will also be introduced to local video competitions in San Diego.
* You will also have a short film to take home to show your friends and family.
 

All About Video Production

You will have the chance to create your own short video in this course. I will take you through the creative process from the creation of your original idea to scripts and storyboards. You will then use HD Cameras to shoot your video. I will also teach you the basic concepts of editing in Adobe Premiere as well.

Possible class video topics include: Public Service Announcements, Commercials and Documentaries.

You will have a hands-on computer experience in this class so be prepared to be creative and have fun!

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current high school student in grades 9-12
  • Interested in learning the basics of Video Production in a creative and fun manner
  • Eager to ask questions, share ideas, and help others in the class
Instructor: Anthony Palmiotto, Point Loma High School
Course open to students in grades 9-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop
Download a Workshop Flyer

 

June 26-30, 2017

Design and Build Your Own Custom Skateboard!
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“Engineering” or “science” are probably not the first words that come to mind when you think “skateboarding”. However, skateboarders require reliable, precisely-shaped skateboards for progressing as both athletes and artists.

In this course, students will turn seven sheets of Hard Rock Maple veneers into a custom-shaped skateboard deck. Along the way, students will learn how the features of skateboard decks affect skateboarding, design a board using CAD (Computer Aided Design), shape a foam mold, use atmospheric pressure to laminate their board, and learn basic woodworking skills.

At the end of the course, students will have a deck that is truly their own to skate! We will also provide trucks and wheels so students are ready to ride!

Course Goals and Learning Objectives
The goal of this course is to expose students to the design/build process and empower them to create and turn ideas into reality. Students will learn:

  • Computer Aided Design (CAD)
  • Mold-making
  • Vacuum forming
  • Woodworking and finishing
  • Tool use and safety

And, at the end of the class, each student will have his or her own skateboard deck – and they will understand how engineering and science have been used as tools to help them produce a high-quality product.

How the Class Will Be Taught

This class will be taught primarily with demonstrations and hands-on student activities that lead to the production of a skateboard deck. Before each student activity, the purpose of the activity will be discussed and a demonstration will be shown, with continuous opportunity to ask questions.

Power tools will be used in a portion of the class, and students will be taught how to use the tools safely and responsibly.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Day 1:

Introduction to skateboard design:

Why certain shapes, why certain materials?

Design your skateboard deck shape

Introduction to CAD:

Why is CAD important?

Getting started in DraftSight

Modeling skateboards in CAD

Day 2:

Finishing CAD models

Introduction to vacuum forming and mold making

How does vacuum forming work?

Start mold making

Day 3:

Finish molds

Introduction to vacuum forming

Press the skateboards

Day 4:

Tool use

How can we be safe with power tools?

How do the tools we use work?

How to cut out your board

Making templates

Cutting the boards

Day 5:

Finishing, sanding, art, sealing

Skateboard safety

Discussion, lessons learned

Instructor: Beau Trifiro, Founder, Open Source Skateboards
Course open to students in grades 10-12.
Course fee: $320.00
Register for this Workshop

 

StudentTECH Junior: Learn to Animate and Program Using Scratch (Grades 3-5)
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Program your own interactive animations and games using the fun and easy block coding language called “Scratch.” Think like a computer programmer by arranging code blocks. Record, edit, and save custom sounds and import them into your “Scratch” animation. Design, storyboard, and code a digital chapter book. Have fun while you learn how to make awesome animations using your own photos and drawings!

Schedule of Class Activities:

Monday, June 26
       Welcome—Explore “Scratch” on a Digital Scavenger Hunt
       Made your first app on day one!

Tuesday, June 27
       Follow-along coding, group programming, and one-on-one
       Make your own “Scratch” cat tour, insert your own photos and characters

Wednesday, June 28
       Embellish Scratch with your own avatars, background, and sounds
       Make cartoon stories–insert your own voice and/or music

Thursday, June 29
       Contribute your “Scratch” animation to the class digital storybook

Friday, June 30
       Save and display your animations for your family and friends to see
       Take home a booklet of projects you can do at home!

Prerequisites:
Must be a current student in 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade
No programming experience needed!

Instructor: Ruth Maas, Computer Science, Steele Canyon High School
Course open to students in grades 3-5.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Multimedia and Visual Effects: Learn Techniques to Enhance Your School Projects!
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This course will be a fun and creative exploration into the world of Multimedia. During the workshop students will have the opportunity to begin to create and produce a digital portfolio to share with friends and family. All of the workshop’s projects have real world applications.

Some Possible Projects for the Class Include

Creating Visual Effects sequences of Planets orbiting the Sun, making yourself Fly like a Superhero or perhaps twirling your own animated Light Saber.

Create logos, book report covers, movie posters and flyers for a school club or activity.

Create a Commercial, a Documentary, a Public Service Announcement or a Short Film.

Anthony Palmiotto has been teaching Cinematic Arts, Multimedia and Video Production at Point Loma High School in the SDUSD since 2007. Under his direction his students have been recognized in local, regional and national video competitions and won thousands of dollars in scholarships.

Graduates from Mr. Palmiotto’s Cinematic Arts program have gone on to to study at the top film schools in the country (e.g. USC, NYU – Tisch School of the Arts and Chapman University).

What You Can Expect from this Workshop

* The basic understandings of Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Premiere.

* The basics understandings of a DSLR camera. I have several you can use but feel free to bring your own.

* How to create visual effects like animated title sequences, motion graphics and special effects for your videos in Adobe After Effects.

* How to create and edit images with Adobe Photoshop to create, logos, avatars and icons for social media, book reports and magazine covers.

* How to edit video footage in Adobe Premiere.

* You will also have the opportunity to post all of the work you create in this course on social media sites such as, Instagram, Facebook and Youtube.

No prior Multimedia experience needed. The only limitations are your imagination.

You will have a hands-on computer experience in this class so be prepared to be creative and have fun!

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current middle/high school student in grades 8-12
  • Interested in learning the basics of Multimedia in a creative and fun manner
  • Eager to ask questions, share ideas, and help others in the class

Instructor: Anthony Palmiotto, Multimedia, Point Loma High School
Course open to students in grades 8-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Introduction to iOS Using Apple’s Swift Programming Language
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This workshop introduces iOS mobile app programming design and development using Apple’s Swift programming language and Xcode’s Integrated Development Environment. Students will learn basic mobile programming language concepts including Swift’s syntax, views, haptic (touch screen) objects, user interplay, memory allocation and control structures. Object oriented concepts will be introduced including iOS’ UIKit classes that contain variables and methods. Students will focus on problem solving skills through program design, algorithm development using sound software engineering practices.

This course will start with the very basics, assuming that students do not have any previous mobile programming experience. It does not require any other programming experience. This course will introduce basic programming concepts using the Swift 3.0 programming language in the Xcode Integrated Development Environment.

Swift is a programming language originally developed and released in 2014 by Apple as the core language for its suite of devices (iPhone, iPad, iMac, Apple Watch, and Mac tv). Swift will eventually replace Objective-C 2.0 as the language of choice when developing Apps and Applications.

All development will be done on a Macintosh system running Mac OS 10.12 or later.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

  • Develop iOS Apps that contain logical sequencing, haptic selection with conditional and iterative control structures.
  • Develop a familiarity with iOS Frameworks and the UIKit in particular.
  • Develop iOS storyboarding that contain good flow and an intuitive user interface.
  • Develop a comfort level with Swift Class/Object design and implementation.

Structure

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture/demonstration, in-class exercises, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project of the student’s choosing. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. While the UCSD lab will have all necessary hardware and software installed for use each day, students are encouraged to bring their own MacBooks to class.

Information on loading all free software will be given to students prior to the first day of class.

Topics to be Covered During the Week

Module 1:
Introduction to Xcode & the Swift Playground
Data Types and Control Structures
UIKit and StoryBoard Design
User Input/Output

Module 2:
-Outlets and Actions
-Strings and Methods
-Algorithm Development

Module 3:
-Frameworks & Storage
-Tables
-Timers

Module 4:
-Classes & Objects
-Animation & SpriteKits

Module 5:
-Apple’s App Store
-Advanced iOS topics
-Final Project

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current high school student entering grades 9-12.
  • Successful completion of Algebra 1 or Integrated I.
  • A basic understanding of computers.

Instructor: Joe Pistone, San Diego Science Teachers Association
Course open to students in grades 9-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

July 5-7, 2017 (three days)

 StudentTECH Junior: Beginning Programming with Alice™ for Younger Students  (Grades 3-5)
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Do you enjoy when learning feels more like fun and games? Have you ever been curious about “computer science” but don’t know where to begin?

Then come spend three fun-filled days exploring Computer Science! You’ll learn what the basics of computer science are while programming with friends. You’ll use an interactive block-based language that allows you to code by simply dragging and dropping instructions. The programming platform ALICE is a free software that allows people of any experience level to learn the concepts of computing by creating animations. Students create their own unique stories and watch in amazement as they bring their stories to life through programming.

  • No past programming experience is required!
  • All software is free and is available online – so kids can continue to explore and build their skills

Topics to be Covered

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

•      Welcome and team builders!
•       Intro to Alice & What is Programming?

Thursday, July 6, 2017

  • Take your program to the NEXT level with parameters and events
  • Team Creation Task

Friday, July 7, 2017

  • Conditionals and repetition
  • Team Projects and Presentations: Let’s get CREATIVE!

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current middle school student in grade 3, 4, or 5.
  • No computer science experience required!

Instructor: Devon Senneseth, Computer Science, Montgomery High School
Course open to students in grades 3-5.
Course fee: $160.00
Register for this Workshop

 

 

July 10-14, 2017

Alice™ – Beginning Computer Programming in a 3D Environment!
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Alice is a 3D programming environment that makes it easy and fun to create animation for storytelling, playing an interactive game, or sharing a video on the web. Alice is designed to be a teaching tool for introductory computing. It uses 3D graphics and a drag-and-drop interface to facilitate a more engaging, less frustrating first programming experience. Created for middle school, high school and college students, this software program offers a first glimpse into the world of computer programming. Come join the fun!

Alice allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games. In Alice, 3-D objects (e.g., people, animals, and vehicles) populate a virtual world and students create a program to animate the objects.

In Alice’s interactive interface, students drag and drop graphic objects to create a program, where the instructions correspond to standard statements in a production oriented programming language, such as Java, C++, and C#. Alice allows students to immediately see how their animation programs run, enabling them to easily understand the relationship between the programming statements and the behavior of objects in their animation. By manipulating the objects in their virtual world, students gain experience with all the programming constructs typically taught in an introductory programming course.

Topics will include learning about program design, object-oriented and event-driven programming, stepwise refinement, sequence, selection, iteration, using functions, and most importantly, problem solving skills critical to become a successful computer programmer.

Alice was created by Carnegie Mellon University to create an environment where a student’s first exposure to computer programming is successful.

For more information on this exciting software, please visit http://alice.org/.

Course Goals and Learning Objectives

The goal of this course is to provide a strong and creative foundation in computer science. This is a hands-on class with object programming and problem solving at its core. The course will take the students through design, develop and implementation of several 3D animation computer programs.

The class is geared to advanced middle school students. It is useful if a student has a basic understanding of Windows and using a computer.

How the Class Will Be Taught

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture and demonstration, in-class exercises, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. Throughout, there will also be handouts and brief presentations on relevant concepts.

Reading

The course will be primarily based on a variety of free handouts and online readings, but the following is recommended if your student would like to learn more after the workshop:

Dann, Wanda P., Cooper, Stephen, Pausch, Randy, Learning to Program with Alice Second Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, isbn 978-0-13-208519-9

Topics to be Covered During this Workshop

Module 1: Introduction to Alice

  • Getting Started with Alice
  • Program Design and Implementation
  • Programming: Putting Together the Pieces

Module 2: Object-Oriented and Event-Driven Programming Concepts

  • Classes, Objects, Methods and Parameters
  • Interactive: Events and Event Handling

Module 3: Using Functions and Control Statements

  • Functions
  • If/Else
  • Repetition

Module 4: Final Presentation

  • Student Projects: Students create their own animated story and can be static (non-interactive) or interactive.

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current middle school student in grade 6-8.
  • A basic understanding of computers.

Instructor: Sara Kazemi, Sweetwater Union High School District/Pilot College Board Computer Science Principles Instructor
Course open to students in grades 6-8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop
 

Introduction to Web Development with HTML, CSS and Javascript
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This course is an introduction to basic web design using a combination of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Students will learn the basic anatomy of a page, traditional and flexible box model page structure, standardization with CSS, and interactivity and control structures with JavaScript. During the course of this class, students will build their own web page that they add elements to as they acquire new skills.

Structure:

This course is taught using a combination of required reading, video lessons, group activities, and individual lab work. Students will begin each section of the course by reading about the concept being covered and following along with a video demonstration. Students will then participate in a problem solving exercise in small groups, followed by a classroom discussion and question/answer period. At the conclusion of each lesson, students will complete individual lab exercises to demonstrate a practical understanding of the topic.

Prerequisites (No textbook necessary):

  • Computer with internet access and Windows 7 or higher
  • Notepad++ or other simple text editor
  • The latest version of Google Chrome

Course Schedule

Day 1: Introduction to HTML

●    Setting up your editor

●    File systems for Web pages

●    The anatomy of a web page

●    Analyzing web pages in Chrome

Day 2: Introduction to CSS

●    CSS elements

●    The box model

●    The flexible box model

●    Advanced CSS3 features

Day 3: Introduction to JavaScript

●    Data types

●    Using forms

●    JavaScript functions

Day 4: JavaScript Advanced Functions

●    Loops

●    Variables

●    Accessing form data with functions

●    Creating interactive web pages

Day 5: Final Project: Interactive Website with Animations and User Input

Instructor: Richard Robinette, Torrey Pines High School
Course open to students in grades 7-10.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Introduction to Object Oriented Programming Using Java
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This workshop introduces object oriented programming development and design using Java. Students will learn basic programming language concepts including Java syntax, input/output, memory allocation and control structures. Object oriented concepts will be introduced including Java classes that contain variables and methods. Students will focus on problem solving skills by algorithm design and development using sound software engineering practices.

This course will start with the very basics, assuming that students do not have any previous Java programming experience. It does not require any other programming experience. This course will introduce basic programming concepts using the Java programming language.

Java is a programming language originally developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems. The language derives much of its syntax from C and C++. Java applications are typically compiled to byte code (class file) that can run on any Java Virtual Machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented language that is specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers “write once, run anywhere.” Java is currently one of the most popular programming languages in use, and is widely used in application software and web applications.

Course Goals and Learning Outcome

  • Develop Java programs that contain sequence, selection and iteration control structures.
  • Develop Java programs that contain methods that may have parameters and a return type.
  • Understand the concepts of Java Classes and Objects.

Structure

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture/demonstration, in-class exercises, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. While students are invited to bring their own laptops to class, the UCSD lab will have all necessary hardware and software installed for their use each day. Java is cross platform and may be run under Windows, Mac OS X or Linux.

Topics to be covered during the week

Module 1: –Introduction to Java

Introduction to the IDE environment

Java keywords

Primitive data types

Input/Output

Module 2: -Conditional Control Structures

-Methods

-Algorithm Development

Module 3: -Iterative Control Structures

-Class Design and Method Development

Module 4: -String Class

-Java Swing Introduction (JOptionPane input and output windows)

-GUI Development

Module 5: -Final Projects: Putting the pieces together.

Prerequisites
Must be a current high school student in grade 9-12.
Successful completion of Algebra 2 or Integrated III.
A basic understanding of computers.


Instructor:
Joe Pistone, San Diego Computer Science Teachers Association
Course open to students in grades 9-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop


July 17-21, 2017

 

Award-Winning Project GUTS (Growing Up Thinking Scientifically): Computer Programming to Solve Real World Problems
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Are you ready to learn how to use code to solve problems in science? In this course, you will learn simple drag and drop block coding through StarLogo Nova, a web-based software program, and pair programming to first understand coding basics and then apply those skills to understand science concepts, earth science, life science, and physical science!

What is Project GUTS?

Condensed into one week by highlighting the key elements of the curriculum, Project GUTS: “Growing Up Thinking Scientifically”, is normally a yearlong science, technology, math and engineering (STEM) program for middle school students. Project GUTS was designed for students from all different backgrounds to engage in scientific inquiry by investigating topics of interest to their local communities through the lens of complex systems.

What can students do as part of Project GUTS?

Project GUTS gives you the opportunity to conduct scientific research right in your school and around your community. You will learn to use technology to explore real-world problems and analyze them with scientific tools. Later, you will have a chance to share your experiments and findings to advise local decision-makers and inform fellow students.

You can make science your mission. Project GUTS helps you explore careers in science, technology, and engineering and propels you along a path to success by developing your computer skills, and giving you access to the very latest technology.

What do we mean by “Growing Up Thinking Scientifically”?

Growing up thinking scientifically means learning to look at the world and ask questions, develop answers to the questions through scientific inquiry, and use critical thinking to assess which ideas are reasonable and which are not. One who grows up thinking scientifically sees science as a dynamic creative endeavor, a way of thinking, rather than a body of facts.

What will students learn this week?

What do students learn in Project GUTS?
At the beginning of the program, students get an in-depth look at complex systems, models and simulation, and learn to create computer models from scratch. Students engage in problem solving and mathematical thinking. The workshop will offer a variety of activities to appeal to different kinds of learners: computer modeling, participatory simulations, data collection and research. Subsequently, students investigate a problem, gather data, and run experiments on their computer models to better understand the problem being studied. Students are assisted by Project GUTS instructor, a UCSD undergraduate student and high school volunteer mentors in customizing existing models to reflect local conditions. At the end of the week, students present their work, compare their models, and share their findings.

About Project GUTS

Winner of numerous awards, including recognition from the Noyce Foundation, the Santa Fe Institute’s Project GUTS (Growing Up Thinking Scientifically) is a successful science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and computer science program. Touted for its success in helping middle school students acquire the computational thinking and inquiry skills they need to study local issues using computational modeling and simulation. Project GUTS is one of only two programs nationwide to receive the Afterschool STEM Impact Award, which was awarded in 2013. Project GUTS has been acknowledged for its strong computing component.

What is StarLogo Nova?

StarLogo Nova is a programming environment that lets students create 3D models and simulations for understanding complex systems. It is a modeling environment that was designed for the educational environment. It gives students access to tools, similar to those used by scientists and researchers. Paired with the Project GUTS curriculum, this software gives student the skills to begin to study complex systems in the world around them.

What are the benefits of StarLogo Nova in conjunction with Project GUTS?

As students begin to think scientifically, StarLogo Nova brings concepts to life by allowing students to:

Createedit, and run games and simulations right in the browser, no installation necessary.
Share projects in public galleries for the world to see.
Collaborate on projects with other users.
Incorporate their own sounds and 3D models into their projects.
Organize code more clearly, with all runtime code now placed on breed pages.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Day 1: Modeling and Simulation

  • This module introduces basic concepts in modeling complex systems through hands-on activities and participatory simulations. A scaffoled serious of highly engaging design and build activities guide students through developing their first computer model is StarLogo Nova, a modeling and simulation environment developed at MIT.

Day 2: Water as a Shared Resource

  • This module considers how humans are impacting the environment and how resources are being used and managed (or not managed) for the future. In particular, the module explores ground water as a shared resource and factors that affect how a resource is shared among stakeholders.

Day 3: Ecosystems

  • This module begins with an exploration of a simple predator-prey model to consider who eats whom – and what happens when 1 population grows faster than another. After learning more about ecosystem dynamics, producers and consumers, and interdependent relationships with an ecosystem, students develop their own model of a local ecosystem.

Day 4: Chemical Reactions

  • This module explores chemical reactions: the conditions under which they occur, the evidence of a chemical reaction, limiting reactants versus reactant in excess, and when chemical reactions stop.

Day 5:   Completion of final projects

Prerequisites:

– The course is open to students in grades 6, 7 or 8.
– A basic understanding of computers
– An interest in computer science


Instructor: Rachael Tarshes, Ed. D., Science Teacher, San Diego Unified School District
Course open to students in grades 6, 7, and 8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Design and Build Your Own Custom Skateboard!
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“Engineering” or “science” are probably not the first words that come to mind when you think “skateboarding”. However, skateboarders require reliable, precisely-shaped skateboards for progressing as both athletes and artists.

In this course, students will turn seven sheets of Hard Rock Maple veneers into a custom-shaped skateboard deck. Along the way, students will learn how the features of skateboard decks affect skateboarding, design a board using CAD (Computer Aided Design), shape a foam mold, use atmospheric pressure to laminate their board, and learn basic woodworking skills.

At the end of the course, students will have a deck that is truly their own to skate! We will also provide trucks and wheels so students are ready to ride!

Course Goals and Learning Objectives
The goal of this course is to expose students to the design/build process and empower them to create and turn ideas into reality. Students will learn:

  • Computer Aided Design (CAD)
  • Mold-making
  • Vacuum forming
  • Woodworking and finishing
  • Tool use and safety

And, at the end of the class, each student will have his or her own skateboard deck – and they will understand how engineering and science have been used as tools to help them produce a high-quality product.

How the Class Will Be Taught

This class will be taught primarily with demonstrations and hands-on student activities that lead to the production of a skateboard deck. Before each student activity, the purpose of the activity will be discussed and a demonstration will be shown, with continuous opportunity to ask questions.

Power tools will be used in a portion of the class, and students will be taught how to use the tools safely and responsibly.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Day 1:

Introduction to skateboard design:

Why certain shapes, why certain materials?

Design your skateboard deck shape

Introduction to CAD:

Why is CAD important?

Getting started in DraftSight

Modeling skateboards in CAD

Day 2:

Finishing CAD models

Introduction to vacuum forming and mold making

How does vacuum forming work?

Start mold making

Day 3:

Finish molds

Introduction to vacuum forming

Press the skateboards

Day 4:

Tool use

How can we be safe with power tools?

How do the tools we use work?

How to cut out your board

Making templates

Cutting the boards

Day 5:

Finishing, sanding, art, sealing

Skateboard safety

Discussion, lessons learned

Instructor: Beau Trifiro, Founder, Open Source Skateboards
Course open to students in grades 10-12.
Course fee: $320.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Right On! Let’s Learn Python!
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This course is an introduction to basic programming using the Python programming language. Students will learn all of Python’s basic language features, including primitive data types, variables, functions, and lists. In addition, students will be introduced to the basic concepts of object-oriented system architecture using Python 3’s class structure.

Structure:

This course is taught using a combination of required reading, video lessons, group activities, and individual lab work. Students will begin each section of the course by reading about the concept being covered and following along with a video demonstration. Students will then participate in a problem solving exercise in small groups, followed by a classroom discussion and question/answer period. At the conclusion of each lesson, students will complete individual lab exercises to demonstrate a practical understanding of the topic.

Course Schedule

Day 1: Introduction to Python

●    The Python File System and setting up your editor

●    Compiling running programs with the PVM

●    Primitive datatypes

●    System input/output

●    Interactivity

Day 2: Control Structures

●    For loops

●    While loops

●    Defining functions

●    Boolean Algebra

Day 3: Processing Data

●    Manipulating Strings

●    Importing modules

●    Lists

Day 4: Defining Objects in Python

●    Declaring classes

●    Instance variables (self.)

●    Scope

●    Class Structure

Day 5: Final Project: Create a game in Pygame

Instructor: Richard Robinette, Torrey Pines High School
Course open to students in grades 7-10.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

StudentTECH Junior: MIT App Inventor for Younger Students! (Grades 3-5)
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Bring your imagination and spend a fun week creating animated Android Apps using MIT’s App Inventor 2, a free web-based software. Create and import your own sounds, avatars, and objects. Invent interactive game apps and share them with your friends!

  • Past programming experience is helpful, but not necessary
  • Students will use iPads to create and run their apps
  • Student created apps can be downloaded to an Android phone
  • Students will be given online resources to continue creating apps at home on their own
  • All software is free and is available online–even after the course is over

Schedule of Class Activities:

Monday, July 17
       Welcome—Getting into the app making mode—Ideas, ideas, and more ideas!

Tuesday, July 18
       Discover how easy it is to program with App Inventor
       Create and import your own sounds, images, and backgrounds
       Add methods, parameters and functions—Multiple screens and buttons

Wednesday, July 19
       Game design, development and collaboratively test your apps

Thursday, July 20
•      
Advanced features and functions—Troubleshooting tips

Friday, July 21
•      
Export your apps, share, and the finale “QR Code” App Tour

Prerequisites
Must be a student in 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade.
No programming experience needed!

Instructor: Ruth Maas, Steele Canyon High School
Course open to students in grades 3-5.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

July 24-28, 2017

Learning an In Demand Programming Language! Python Programming for High School Students!
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This workshop introduces object oriented programming development and design using Python. Students will learn basic programming language concepts including Python syntax, input/output and control structures. Object oriented concepts will be introduced including Python classes that contain variables and methods. Students will focus on problem solving skills by program design and algorithm development using sound software engineering practices.

This course will start with the very basics, assuming that students do not have any previous Python programming experience. It does not require any other programming experience. This course will introduce basic programming concepts using the Python programming language.

Python (named after the British comedy troupe and NOT the snake) is an interpreted programming language originally developed by Guido van Rossum and used by companies in the Arts, Business and Education. Since its inception years ago, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in commerce and gaming.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

  • Develop Python programs that contain sequence, selection and iteration control structures.
  • Develop Python programs that contain methods that may have parameters and a return type.
  • Understand the concepts of Objects and Python classes.
  • Work with PyGame, a set of Python modules designed for writing games.

Structure

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture/demonstration, in-class exercises, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. While students are invited to bring their own laptops to class, the UCSD lab will have all necessary hardware and software installed for their use each day. Python is cross platform and may be run under Windows, Mac OS X or Linux.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Module 1:
Introduction to Python
Introduction to the IDE environment
Python keywords
Primitive data types
Input/Output

Module 2:
-Selection Control Structure
-Methods
-Algorithm Development

Module 3:
-Iteration Control Structure
-Algorithm Development

Module 4:
-PyGame Introduction
-Game Design and Implementation

Module 5:
-Final Project: Putting the pieces together

Prerequisites
Must be a current high school student in grade 9-12.
Successful completion of Algebra 1 or Integrated I.
A basic understanding of computers.

Instructor: Joe Pistone, San Diego Computer Science Teachers Association
Course open to students in grades 9-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

StudentTECH Junior: Engineer a Road That Won’t Erode! Earth Science and Engineering for Younger Students! (Grades 3-5)
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California occasionally erupts into flames and we have to understand the challenges. Wildfires and roads may not seem to be related, but fighting wildfires is dependent on getting access to backcountry areas. The roads that firefighters use in natural areas are often just made of dirt. That is a problem because unless they are engineered correctly, dirt roads tend to wash out during heavy rainstorms.

Road building is an art based on science and engineering skills. Students in this course will learn about dirt, soil, and sediment: how soil forms and its composition (weathering and organics); how it moves (erosion); and where it settles (deposition). They will learn about slope, watershed, and drainage and the importance of native vegetation for erosion control.

Hands-on experience combined with technology and data analysis will build their knowledge base. Students will develop communication skills by reporting their observations and then sharing findings with their peers and UCSD StudentTECH staff.

Course Goals and Learning Objectives

The goal of this course is to develop earth science and engineering skills and knowledge that allow them to solve real world problems, and communication skills so they can share what they have learned. It is based on the California State Standards for Earth Science and Engineering.

Students will learn

  • Earth Science Concepts:
    • Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water…breaks rocks, soils and sediments into smaller particles and moves them around. (Earth Systems 4-ESS2)
  • Engineering Practices:
    • Make observations and/or measurements to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon.
    • Cause and effect relationships are identified, tested, and used to explain change.
  • Media and Communication:
    • Recall relevant information from experiences.
    • Website design: Google Sites

How the Class will be Taught

This course will be taught through a combination of hands-on science investigation, observation, and challenges, plus technology based tutorials and activities, along with individual and small group instruction. Students will also share their experiences and knowledge through media and in-class discussions.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Day 1:

Introduction to Earth Science concepts:

Online learning sequence:

Sediment

Decomposition, erosion, deposition

Team Challenge

Presentation: Fire! In the Watershed

Introduction to website design:

Google site design tutorial

Team website design

Day 2:

Hands-on earth science learning stations

Continue team website development

Begin Road design

Group discussion

Presentation: Slippery Slope!

Team Journal entry

Day 3:

Hands-on earth science stations – take data

Continue website development

Begin road development

Test road design

Group discussion

Presentation: What’s a Culvert? What’s a Berm?

Team Journal entry

Day 4:

Continue website development

Continue road development and testing

Group discussion

Presentation: It’s All About Roots

Team Journal entry

Day 5:

Continue road development

Final road test

Group Discussion

Final Team Journal entry

Prerequisites
Must be an elementary student in grades 3, 4 or 5.

Instructor: Ann Marie Wellhouse, Learning Design and Technology Specialist
Course open to students in grades 3-5.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

Let’s Shout and Clap! You’re Going to Create an Awesome App! MIT App Inventor for Older Students!
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Learn to program Android phone apps: art, coding, and sound.

MIT App Inventor for Android is a programming tool that makes it easy for anyone — programmers and non-programmers, adults and kids — to create mobile applications for the Android phone.

Mobile applications are triggering a fundamental shift in the way people experience computing. Ten years ago, people “went to the computer” to perform tasks and access the Internet, and they used cell phones only to make calls. Today, smartphones have become computers in our pockets, serving our communication and information needs and making the web part of all that we do. Ten years ago, people’s use of computing was largely dissociated from real life. Today, with the ubiquity of social networking and pervasive communication, online and offline life are becoming fused.

What We Will Cover During This Workshop:

Monday  – Hello Kitty – Creating Your First App Within A Matter Of Minutes!

Find out all about App Inventor and why it is creating such a buzz in the programming community. The programming environment and tools such as the Component Designer, Blocks Editor, and Emulator will be discussed. We will create a simple digital portfolio where your apps will be made accessible for others to download. Next you will create your own paint programming program as we learn to create interaction, change pixel size, change colors, buttons, event handlers, and take a picture on the camera and the draw on it.

We will also create your own Paint Pot app.  The Paint Pot app lets the user draw on the screen in different colors, and then update it so that the user can take a picture and draw on that instead.

Tuesday  – Creating Advanced Applications.

We will make a Whack-A-Mole game where a mole pops up on random locations on the screen. Touching the mole will cause the phone to vibrate and add to your score. We will learn about sprites, time/clocks, sound, and buttons. You will post your apps online and learn how to create quick response codes so that others can download and play your game.

Who does not love to text? Today we will create the No Texting While Driving app receives text messages, and notifies the user even when the app is not currently running. If the app is running (visible on the screen), when it receives an SMS, the message will be displayed on the screen. If it’s not running, the user will receive a Notification in the status bar, which can be viewed by pulling down the status bar.

Lastly we will work on Mini Golf, an addictive little game app that demonstrates how to use the FlingTouchUp and TouchDown gestures on Sprites. Hold down the positioning arrows to move the ball to the desired position on the tee, then Tee Off by flinging the ball toward the hole. After a hole is scored, the screen randomly sets up a new hole, providing a unique challenge every time.

Wednesday –  Creating Advanced Applications

We will make a Ladybug Chase game app.  In this “first-person chewer” game, the user will be represented by a ladybug, whose movement will be controlled by the device’s tilt.  This brings the user into the game in a different way from Whack-A-Mole.

We will make a Breakout game app.  In this app the user will control a paddle and attempt to bounce a moving ball off the paddle and when it hits bricks, they are removed from the game.  The goal being to remove all the bricks, and not let the ball touch the bottom.

Finally, we will make a Paris Map Tour App.  This app will be a tour guide for a virtual trip to Paris.  This app brings in two high-level components to help access Google Maps; ActivityStarter which makes it possible for you to launch another app from your app, and the WebViewer, which shows any web page you want within a subpanel of your app.

Thursday – Creating Advanced Applications

We will make a Xylophone app.  This app will be a xylophone that uses the Sound component to play different audio files.  In addition, we will program it to remember our selections and replay the sound selections we have chosen.

Next, we will make an Magic 8 Ball app.  For this app, we will program the oscillation sensor.  So, when a user shakes the device, the app will display an answer to the users yes/no question.

Finally, we will make a QuizMe app.  This is a trivia game about baseball, but you can use it as a template to build quizzes on any topic.

Friday  – Creating Advanced Applications.

Now it is time for you to design your very own app. We will sketch out the design and programming flow, create the art and sound elements, code the app, and save online for your friends and family to download.

Prerequisites:
Must be a current middle or high school student in grades 7-10.
Interested in learning how to program your own Android applications (Loaner tablets will be available.)
Willingness to work in teams
Eager to ask questions, share ideas, and help others in the class
No prior programming needed.


Instructor:
Sean Gullikson, Cajon Valley School District
Course open to students in grades 7-10.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Lord of the Robots! Advanced Robotics That Challenge Your Mind!
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Take your engineering skills to the next level with this exciting, hands-on robotics camp! Learn to build complex, yet simplistic everyday machines like a roomba vacuum. The ultimate challenge is up to the students when they design a Rube Goldberg machine utilizing their robot. These challenges are designed to develop team building skills, as well as reinforce the design process, time management and leadership! Students will get practical experience with design tolerances, limited materials, and learn to follow a timeline. It is encouraged that students have either taken Level 1 Robotics or have some previous understanding of Mindstorm programming. Not only is this a great opportunity to grow your engineering skills, but students will also be recognized for their creativity and leadership in our awards ceremony at the end! Join us now to experience a new level of excitement found in engineering complex tasks!

Course Goals and Learning Objectives

The goal of this course is to provide a strong and creative foundation in computer science. This is a hands-on class with problem solving at its core. Topics include learning about program design, using functions and loops to complete challenges, and most importantly testing the problem solving skills critical in becoming a successful computer programmer. The course will take the students through the design, development and implementation of their robots. This course promises an unforgettable experience!

The class is geared to advanced middle school students. It is assumed the student has a basic understanding of Mindstorms or other programming.

How the Class Will Be Taught

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture and demonstration, in-class lab, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. Each Module length of time depends on the progress of the class.

Curriculum

The course will be primarily based on a variety of sources, but primarily from the Robotics Academy of Carnegie Mellon.

Topics to be Covered During This Workshop

Module 1:
Introduction to Lego Mindstorm NXT
Build Basic Robot
Drive forward
Drive reverse
Accelerate, turn and maneuver
Beginning Programming
Drive in Square
Detect DistanceDetect Sound, touch, bumper, ultrasonic
Follow Line

Module 2:
Programming
Move
Loops
Wait/Events
Switches
Blocks

Module 3:
Practical Challenges
Roomba Vacuum
Chimney Climber
Lego Brick Sorter

Module 4:
Final Project
Incorporate skills to develop special robot and engineering project (Rube Goldberg like Machine)

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current middle student in grades 7 – 8.
  • A more advanced understanding of robotics with student having gained robotics skills through classroom activities, clubs and perhaps even competitions with other teammates

Instructor: John Galipault, Robotics Coordinator Rancho Santa Fe
Course open to students in grades 7-8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

July 31-  August 4, 2017

Have Fun with Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs)
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San Diego is a leader when it comes to building Remotely Operated Vehicles, (ROV’s), especially when it comes to exploring our ocean.  This technology, also known as Blue Technology, is an ever expanding field with many employment opportunities available. Over 70% of our planet is covered with water.  There are places in our ocean we have never seen but with the advent of ROV’s mounted with cameras, we can explore virtually anywhere depending on how the ROV was designed.  In this course, we will build a generic ROV, test it out and then redesign/build another ROV that will be more efficient based on our trial and error testing.

What is an ROV?
A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is an unoccupied underwater robot that is connected to a ship by a series of cables. These cables transmit command and control signals between the operator and the ROV, allowing remote navigation of the vehicle.

Why Are ROVs Advancing Ocean Science?
Technology to support deep-ocean exploration, research, and information collection has steadily improved but greater improvements are needed to significantly increase the pace, effectiveness, and scope of understanding our ocean world. Advancements will enable us to explore longer, deeper, and across greater spans while collecting and sharing new and more data. As always, these tools must withstand the rigors of depth, salinity, and pressure.

There’s a lot to Learn so Let’s See What Topics Will be Covered This Week:

Day 1 – Introduction to the ROV and the Science Behind them
– What is an ROV
– Buoyancy

– Density
– Building our first prototype in groups of 2-3

Day 2 – Complete construction
– Electricity – how motors work
– Test ROV  (Pool)

Day 3 – ReDesign
– New design
– Start to build new ROV
– Test ROV (afternoon in the Pool)

Day 4 – Ocean trial
– Repairs/Adjustments to new design
– Ocean trials with mounted camera

Day 5 – How it’s done?

– Visit local manufacturer of ROVs

Prerequisites

  • Must be a middle school student in grades 7-8

Eager to ask questions, share ideas, and help others in the class 

Instructor: Dan Grendziak, Vice Principal, Farb Middle School
Course open to students in grades 7-8.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

Java Programming Academy for Middle School Students
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This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. Students will learn all of Java’s basic language features, including primitive data types, variables, methods, and objects. In addition, students will receive an introduction to object-oriented program design. This will include a thorough examination of the concept of an object, and a complete breakdown of Java class architecture.

Structure:

This course is taught using a combination of required reading, video lessons, group activities, and individual lab work. Students will begin each section of the course by reading about the concept being covered and following along with a video demonstration. Students will then participate in a problem solving exercise in small groups, followed by a classroom discussion and question/answer period. At the conclusion of each lesson, students will complete individual lab exercises to demonstrate a practical understanding of the topic.

Course Schedule

Day 1: Introduction to Java

●    The Java File System and setting up your editor

●    Compiling and running programs, and the JVM

●    Static Methods

●    Primitive data vs objects

●    System input/output

Day 2: Control Structures

●    For loops

●    While loops

●    Methods

●    Boolean Algebra

Day 3: Using Objects in Java

●    Strings as objects

●    Importing objects

●    Arrays and ArrayLists

Day 4: Java Object Architecture

●    Declaring/initializing objects

●    Object data members vs static methods

●    Object inheritanc

Day 5: Final Project: The inventory System

Prerequisites:   Must be a current middle school student in grades 7-9.
No programming experience needed!


Instructor:
Sean Gullikson, Computer Science Teacher, Hillsdale Middle School
Course open to students in grades 7-9.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

 

August 7-11, 2017

Introduction to Object Oriented Programming using C++
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This workshop introduces object oriented programming development and design using C++. Students will learn basic programming language concepts including C++ syntax, input/output, memory allocation and control structures. Object oriented concepts will be introduced including C++ classes that contain variables and functions. Students will focus on problem solving skills by program design and algorithm development using sound software engineering practices.

This course will start with the very basics, assuming that students do not have any previous C++ programming experience. It does not require any other programming experience. This course will introduce basic programming concepts using the C++ programming language.

More About the C++ Programming Language

C++ is a programming language that was an outgrowth of the C programming language. Originally called “C with Classes”, C++ introduced Objected Oriented paradigms to software engineers already familiar with C syntax. The language was created by Bjarne Stroustrup while at AT&T’s Bell Labs in the 1980s. C++ is currently one of the most popular programming languages in commercial use, and is widely used in application software and web applications.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

  • Develop C++ programs that contain sequence, selection and iteration control structures.
  • Develop C++ programs that contain methods that may have parameters and a return type.
  • Understand the concepts of Objects and C++ classes.

Structure

This course is taught using classroom and lab instruction employing lecture/demonstration, in-class exercises, student participation, and class activities leading to a final project. Classes will include introductory concept presentations, followed by in-class exercises. While students are invited to bring their own laptops to class, the UCSD lab will have all necessary hardware and software installed for their use each day. C++ is cross platform and may be run under Windows, Mac OS X or Linux.

Topics to be Covered During the Week

Module 1:
Introduction to C++
Introduction to the IDE environment
C++ keywords
Primitive data types
Input/Output

Module 2:
-Conditional Control Structure
-Functions
-Algorithm Development

Module 3:
-Iterative Control Structure
-Class Design and Function Development

Module 4:
-Strings in C++
-Recursion

Module 5:
-Final Project: Putting the pieces together.

Prerequisites:

  • Must be a current high school student in grades 9-12.
  • Successful completion of Algebra 2 or Integrated III. An unofficial transcript will be requested.
  • A basic understanding of computers.

Instructor: Joe Pistone, San Diego Computer Science Teachers Association
Course open to students in grades 9-12.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop

August 14-18, 2017

EnviroBio Avengers! Techniques for Studying Local Ecosystems & the Impacts of Human Activities
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Are you interested in learning how you can study the health of different habitats in our community? Then EnviroBio Avengers is for you! Environmental Biology involves the investigation to the impacts of human actions, pollutants and other conditions on wild communities. Although biology is the focus, studies often involve chemistry and math to help in studying an ecosystem. This week long workshop will involve a combination of outdoor data collection and learning and computer-based data analysis. We will take a hands-on approach to environmental biology by exploring onsite habitats throughout the week and conducting several studies in the field. During the computer component, participants will learn how to utilize the internet and other computer sources to look at different datasets as well as learn different analysis techniques for visualizing data. Topics will cover the biology, ecosystems and environmental health of local habitats. We will study human impacts in our community, learn about local ecosystems, and collect and analyze data that helps us to evaluate these ecosystems. For example, we will collect and analyze water samples from a local source, discuss and study the community this source is part of, and return to the computer lab to import and graph our data.  This fun workshop will help students learn how they can study habitats near their homes, and help them to have a better understanding of the impacts of human activities on these habitats.

Topics to be Covered this Week

Monday Aug. 14th

  • Introduction to environmental biology and workshop
  • Outdoors: Learn about different sampling methods through hands-on sample testing
  • In Lab: Review several software programs we will be using throughout the week

Tuesday Aug. 15th

  • Outdoors: How to use and operate a GPS. GPS Activity outdoors
  • In Lab: GIS data analysis in QGIS (http://www.qgis.org/en/site/)

Wednesday Aug. 16th

  • Outdoors: Data collection in nearby habitat
  • In Lab: Design of study for beach site in groups. Review of online data available for beach site
  • Presentation of results on Friday!

Thursday Aug. 17th

  • Outdoors: Beach site data collection (near Scripps – take shuttle from SDSC to beach)
  • In Lab: Organize and digitize/upload data, start presentation slides

Friday Aug. 18th

  • In Lab: Analyze data & Finish presentations.
    Afternoon: Group presentation of results

Prerequisites
Must be a current middle or high school student in grades 8-10.
Basic understanding of biology and chemistry.


Instructor:
Elizabeth Fergison, Ocean Science Analytics
Course open to students in grades 8-10.
Course fee: $265.00
Register for this Workshop


Questions?

If you have any questions about the registration process, please contact Ange Mason, SDSC Education and Outreach, via phone at (858) 534-5064 or email at amason@ucsd.edu.

Privacy Policy

The San Diego Supercomputer Center is proud to demonstrate our commitment to your privacy. We will treat personal information received via workshops registration forms in a manner consistent with current Privacy Policy standards. Information submitted to us via email, fax or US mail will not be shared with entities outside of the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego and will be used only for the purpose for which it is intended.

Check Payment Address

If you choose to pay by check, please send a check for the full amount and your student’s name and workshop(s), made payable to UC Regents, to the following address:

Ange Mason
Attn: SDSC Summer Workshops
San Diego Supercomputer Center
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
MC 0505
La Jolla, CA 92093-0505

SPECIAL NOTE TO CREDIT CARD USERS:

When using a credit card, rather than a personal check or money order, please be sure that you do not intend to cancel your registration. Our credit card transactions are processes through industry standard authorizee.net, which allows 120 days from time of purchase for credit card refunds. After that time, UCSD cannot process a credit card refund.

Our advice: If there is even a remote chance that you might need to cancel, please send a check for your registration payment. Processing refunds is much easier this way.

Please also refer to our refund policy below.

Our Refund Policy 

In order to best serve our students, SDSC StudentTECH has a firm cancellation policy. Once payment has been made in full, there are no refunds. Only credit will be given. Cancellations or changes must be made in writing at least 10 days prior to the first day of class. Cancellations will receive a credit for 50 % of the course registration fee. No credits will be issued after 10 days prior to the first day of class. Credits must be used within one year from the start date of the canceled program. Students who are no shows will not be eligible for a credit and may not reschedule.